Archive for July, 2014

Burton Brewery Locomotive Day 20th July 2014

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

Mick Connors has sent us the following –

 

Chasewater Railway

Burton Brewery Locomotive Day 20th July 2014

Four Brewery Diesels & Wagons

 

Plus visiting

Brewery Road Vehicles

 

Chasewater Country Park, Pool Lane (off A5), Burntwood, Staffordshire WS8 7NL Tel: 01543 452623 www.chasewaterrailway.org

Joint BHS / Guild of Beer Writers Seminar – “Beer writing – past, present and future”

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

British Guild of Beer Writers/Brewery History Society

 “Beer writing – past, present and future”

Thursday, 23rd October 2014.

10.30 a.m. – 4.30 p.m.

The Hook Norton Brewery

Brewery Lane

Hook Norton

Oxfordshire

OX15 5NY

 

 

The British Guild of Beer Writers and the Brewery History Society are holding a joint one day seminar entitled “Beer Writing; past, present and future”.  This will review how beer writing has developed over the past two hundred years; examine coverage of beer in the modern media and explore how beer communication might evolve in the digital age.

 

 

10.30

Registration

 

 

11.00

Welcome

 

James Clarke

11.05

Beer writing in the Victorian era

 

James Sumner

11.30

Gravity, Tint and Bitterness: Beer Writers 1900-1960.

 

Ray Anderson

 

12.00

The birth of modern beer writing-

1960 to the present day

 

Ray Newman

12.30

Does beer get its fair share of the voice?

Beer in the media today.

 

Marverine Cole

 

1.00

 

Lunch

 

2.00

“Taking the past into the future: new approaches to preserving and sharing our heritage”

 

Nick Stanhope
“We are what we do”.

2.30

Panel debate

“How do we ensure that beer writing has a glorious future?”

 

Chair – Adrian Tierney-Jones

 

3.30

Brewery Tour

 

 

4.30

Close for a beer (or two!)

 

 

The workshop is being held at Hook Norton’s stunning Victorian Tower Brewery is the heart of the Oxfordshire countryside.  Transport will be provided to and from Banbury Station for those travelling by train. 

 

The workshop is free of charge to members of the Guild and Brewery History Society and their guests.  There is a fee of £25 for non-members.  Please RSVP to Angie Armitage at Cask Marque angie@cask-marque.co.uk.    Please let Angie know if you require transport from the station. 

‘Built to Brew’ by Lynn Pearson, published by English Heritage

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014
Architectural historian and BHS member, Dr Lynn Pearson, has written a stunning book which has just been published by English Heritage
This is available from the BHS book shop (please mention that you are a BHS member when ordering; see http://beerinnprint.co.uk/category_list.php?list=2) and is described by Paul Travis below –
Built to Brew s
‘Built to Brew, The history and heritage of the brewery’ has been written by Lynn Pearson, published by English Heritage this June, with a price of £25. Looking at the book is not dissimilar to the sensation of viewing a select large box of excellent chocolates – whatever you choose is full of delight, both for the chocolates and for this book – any page in the book will reveal interesting information supported by plenty of good illustrations. But to avoid flitting from one section to another go to the contents list where you will see the structure of the book – from the starting point of ‘beer’, then to early brewers (Iron Age, medieval, country-house), development of commercial breweries in the 18th, 19th & 20th centuries up to the present. Then into more detailed analysis of the brewery – the design and planning of the brewery by prominent brewery architects and their works and the insides of the brewery – the equipment for the processes. Powering the brewery looks at the various systems – manpower, wind & water, steam, gas & electricity. A couple more chapters – Burton-on-Trent, the Beer Capital deserves its heritage, growth and decline, and other buildings associated with breweries – such as offices, monuments, plaques, social facilities and finally the current brewery buildings and those that have been lost. The appendices are generous too – chapter notes, bibliography, glossary, Indexes of  breweries and locations, illustration credits.
The book structure is logical and the content is relevant and clear and interesting and well supported with good illustrations; the comments on the benefits of the brewery buildings to the environment (and their loss) are well made.
The book is not cheap financially but the overall content of the book is good value makes £25 well worthwhile.
Paul