‘Built to Brew’ by Lynn Pearson, published by English Heritage

Architectural historian and BHS member, Dr Lynn Pearson, has written a stunning book which has just been published by English Heritage
This is available from the BHS book shop (please mention that you are a BHS member when ordering; see http://beerinnprint.co.uk/category_list.php?list=2) and is described by Paul Travis below –
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‘Built to Brew, The history and heritage of the brewery’ has been written by Lynn Pearson, published by English Heritage this June, with a price of £25. Looking at the book is not dissimilar to the sensation of viewing a select large box of excellent chocolates – whatever you choose is full of delight, both for the chocolates and for this book – any page in the book will reveal interesting information supported by plenty of good illustrations. But to avoid flitting from one section to another go to the contents list where you will see the structure of the book – from the starting point of ‘beer’, then to early brewers (Iron Age, medieval, country-house), development of commercial breweries in the 18th, 19th & 20th centuries up to the present. Then into more detailed analysis of the brewery – the design and planning of the brewery by prominent brewery architects and their works and the insides of the brewery – the equipment for the processes. Powering the brewery looks at the various systems – manpower, wind & water, steam, gas & electricity. A couple more chapters – Burton-on-Trent, the Beer Capital deserves its heritage, growth and decline, and other buildings associated with breweries – such as offices, monuments, plaques, social facilities and finally the current brewery buildings and those that have been lost. The appendices are generous too – chapter notes, bibliography, glossary, Indexes of  breweries and locations, illustration credits.
The book structure is logical and the content is relevant and clear and interesting and well supported with good illustrations; the comments on the benefits of the brewery buildings to the environment (and their loss) are well made.
The book is not cheap financially but the overall content of the book is good value makes £25 well worthwhile.
Paul

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